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Book Trailers - for HS students: CC/ Rationale

Contains links, examples and instructions for creating student-made book trailers.

Common Core Standards

Of course a video project is a TOOL and it depends on how you use it, the objectives and criteria you develop for students, etc.

That said, my friends at the Michigan Interscholastic Press Association have done the work of identifying the Common Core “College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading” that most closely align with broadcast journalism. They are smart – please have a look at their CCSS alignment wikispace: http://mipaccsalignment.wikispaces.com/broadcast

 

These are some other Common Core standards that could connect to video production projects, depending on how you developed the project criteria:

Research Common Core State Standards

W.9-10.6   Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products, taking advantage of technology’s capacity to link to other information and to display information flexibly and dynamically.

W.11-12.6   Use technology, including the Internet, to produce, publish, and update individual or shared writing products in response to ongoing feedback, including new arguments or information.  

W.9-10.7    Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.11-12.7     Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

W.9-10.8     Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the usefulness of each source in answering the research question; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and following a standard format for citation.

W.11-12.8      Gather relevant information from multiple authoritative print and digital sources, using advanced searches effectively; assess the strengths and limitations of each source in terms of the task, purpose, and audience; integrate information into the text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and overreliance on any one source and following a standard format for citation.

W.9-10.9     Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.  a.  Apply grades 9–10 Reading standards to literature(e.g., “Analyze how an author draws on and transforms source material in a specific work [e.g., how Shakespeare treats a theme or topic from Ovid or the Bible or how a later author draws on a play by Shakespeare]”).

W.9-10.9     Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.  b. Apply grades 9–10 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning”).

W.11-12.9      Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. a.  Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literature (e.g., “Demonstrate knowledge of eighteenth-, nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century foundational works of American literature, including how two or more texts from the same period treat similar themes or topics”).

W.11-12.9      Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. b.  Apply grades 11–12 Reading standards to literary nonfiction (e.g., “Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning [e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court Case majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses]”).

WHY use video production in your lessons?

EDUCATIONAL RATIONALE

I hear and I forget

I see and I remember.

I do and I understand.

-Confucius

Video production is:

...problem-based learning (inquiry)

...Gradual Release of Responsibility: Teacher acts as facilitator and guide. Students do the work.

...a vehicle for promoting collaborative, learner-centered, and inquiry oriented learning

...engaging and personalized learning: “combining both audio and visual learning tools in the classroom has increased student engagement because it adds variety…” from Transforming Learning with Technology publication by Dr. Tammy Stephens (MMSD information shared in the Student Device Selection Committee, 6/4/2014)

...one way “to efficiently locate, analyze, synthesize, and evaluate information and then communicate and demonstrate understanding of concepts,” from Transforming Learning with Technology publication by Dr. Tammy Stephens (MMSD information shared in the Student Device Selection Committee, 6/4/2014)

...a way for students to better retain what they learn.

...a vehicle for students to better express their deeper understanding of core classroom content.

...a tool to promote creativity and problem-solving.

...hands-on practice with “real life” skills: planning and organization, time management, cooperative learning, communication, technology skills, problem-solving, information synthesizing, leadership and “followership”

...speaking, writing, reading, listening and sometimes math skills.

...a tool to force students to think at a higher level: Students sew information together in an organized way that forces them to think about a bigger body of information.

...integration of technology skills and opportunity for students to practice and develop those skills.

...the professional “language” of the future.

 

Publishing a video to the web creates a more meaningful, real-world audience and thus a more meaningful learning experience and provides more motivation than “What do I have to do to get the grade?”

 

There are many steps in creating video, which provides an opportunity to involve each and every student.

A video doesn’t just start with picking up a camera; It is a process that is thought out and planned far before the camera is turned on. [source: “Engaging Students in Video Production and Movie Making in the classroom” slideshow/ presentation from Tech & Learning and SONY, Dec. 9, 2009]