Skip to main content

La Follette Library Portal: Audio Recording

Connect - Discover - Achieve

Podcasting!

Tips for good audio

Some points for your audio:

  • Practice before you record!

  • Articulate, and pronounce words accurately

  • Pacing: Don’t speak too fast or too slow

  • Volume: should be medium loud

  • Emphasis: Pause in spaces, add emphasis in other areas - avoid a flat, monotone delivery

more tips here: https://blog.wevideo.com/for-work/voice-over-video-part-2/

Using your smart phone to record audio

You can record audio with any smartphone (provided you have enough memory):
 

Use your device to record.

 

Androids and Iphones both have: the “Voice Memos” app. (in Utilities on iphones)

  • Record yourself into your phone.

  • Select the mobileprint-shareicon.png image or the sgOzY.png and then “mail” to email the .m4a (iphone) or .3gp (Android) file to yourself.

  • Then, go to your email, download it (usually goes to J drive>My Downloads from school computers)

Teachers: You can add voice COMMENTS in Google Docs

Teachers: You can add voice COMMENTS in Google Docs

Talk and Comment - a Chrome extension

Chromebooks for Podcasting

​Chromebooks do not have memory for software or files, but almost all of them DO have built-in microphones and cameras and can connect to the Internet.

RECORDING AUDIO WITH A CHROMEBOOK

Vocaroohttps://vocaroo.com/

Vocaroo provides users with a free, web-based application to RECORD audio and share it with others.  

How do you share your AUDIO files? You can both download your audio files directly to a hard drive and, (if on a Chromebook) provide your audience a link on Vocaroo where they can listen to the audio file directly. However, audio files (unless downloaded and saved) are only stored on Vocaroo's servers for a reported “few months” according to their FAQ page.

SpreakerChrome app

Spreaker lets you record up to 15 min. at a time, or broadcast live. Also includes features to mix voice, music, and effects.

You can also follow other podcasts - original content on every topic.

Spreaker is available on the web, as well as on Android, iOS, and Windows devices.

How do you share your AUDIO files? Once you're done recording, Spreaker saves your audio to your profile. You can click on it and share that link with others. (You can also download the audio file from the episode>editing> Episode Audio File)

AudioRecorder: Chrome app

AudioRecorder is VERY simple!

Downside: Only records shorter pieces (a few min. max) and crashes with longer recordings (20+ min.) 

How do you share your AUDIO files? Once you click on the mic icon to stop recording, the Chromebook automatically downloads the file. In the download window, you have to drag the wav file to your Google drive. Then you have to go to your Google Drive to share the file with your teacher/ others.

Simple Audio Recorder: Chrome extension

Downside: Only records shorter pieces (a few min. max) and crashes with longer recordings (55+ min.) 

Once I installed/ allowed the extension, I didn't know how to use it -- I found a tiny microphone icon in the upper right corner of my web browser and clicked it to record audio.

How do you share your AUDIO files? Once you click on the mic icon to stop recording, the Chromebook automatically downloads the file and a window pops up in the lower right hand corner of the screen. Next, in the download window, you have to drag the wav file to your Google drive. Finally, go to your Google Drive to share the file with your teacher/ others. 

Voice Recorder: Chrome app or visit online directly at  https://online-voice-recorder.com/

After recording you can trim the sound and save it to your computer.

How do you share your AUDIO files? Once you click on the red dot icon to stop recording, press the blue "save" button.

It will take a minute or so to process and then the save button will be replaced with "Click to Save." Click it and then a window pops up in the lower right hand corner of the screen. Next, in the download window, you have to name your mp3 file, then drag it to your Google drive. Finally, go to your Google Drive to share the file with your teacher/ others. 

Mic Note -Voice Recorder & NotepadChrome app

Mic Note allows you to record audio and take notes AT the SAME TIME. (Recommended for Lectures, Meetings, Conferences, Interviews, Brainstormings, Quick Notes, To-Do Lists, making plans, etc.)

 

EDITING AUDIO WITH A CHROMEBOOK

Twisted Wavehttps://twistedwave.com/

Twisted Wave Online is a free, web-based application to EDIT audio (but not record it).

How do you share your AUDIO files?  You can download the edited audio file directly into Google Drive, or export the file(s) into your hard drive.

BONUS: Twisted Wave also lets you import audio files from elsewhere (Vocaroo, your Google Drive, etc.) and edit them.

 

 

PUBLISHING AUDIO WITH A CHROMEBOOK

SoundCloudChrome app

Create a free account to upload sound tracks you have saved on your computer (a Pro account for $ allows more than 200 min. of audio, the free one caps out at 190 min.) to your personal SoundCloud "channel."

Soundcloud also allows you to add comments to your audio tracks and share them with others. You can share the audio links and/or follow other SoundCloud channels.

SpreakerChrome app

Listed above as an app for recording audio, you can also use Spreaker to publish your audio and share it with others. It holds up to five hours total of audio files, and creates a "permalink" for each podcast "episode" you create/ post.

Vocaroohttps://vocaroo.com/

Very simple sharing function - can only record and share one audio file at a time, unlike Spreaker or SoundCloud where you can create a "channel" and share multiple audio files from one account/user.

Podcast Ideas

Book Reviews: For ideas, view Just One More Book!!, which includes example book reviews. Create class podcasts of favorite books through the use of “book chats.” For example, students can discuss their favorite characters and how they changed throughout the story, or they can discuss elements such as plot, theme, and setting. Students can also create thumbs-up/thumbs-down book reviews by providing a thumbs-up or thumbs-down rating and stating reasons for their choice.
 

Persuasive messages: identify the persuasive message and describe what makes it persuasive (answers might include convincing ideas, well thought-out arguments, or strong opinions) found in your favorite books, television shows, video games, and movies. You might also identify any propaganda techniques in use (such as assertions, bandwagon, card stacking, glittering generalities, lesser of two evils, name calling, pinpointing the enemy, plain folks, testimonials, and transfer). Critique these messages in your podcasts.

Writing/ Culinary Arts: Create your own recipe podcasts or critiques of recipes you have tried. For ideas, view Spatulatta, which includes podcasts about creating recipes.

Biographies: Write biographies of significant figures in history, authors, or characters, or even your own autobiography, to podcast.

Vocabulary:  Create a podcast by crafting sentences using new vocabulary words you learn in class (content specific). You can listen to the podcasts at Just Vocabulary for examples. You can also create songs using vocabulary words. Listen to the Princeton Review Vocabulary Minute Podcasts for examples.

Science: Write a research report or brief narrative on a science topic you’re studying, then create podcasts about these concepts. Listen to the podcasts at Science Update for examples.

Math: Create podcasts to help your classmates understand how to work through problems and concepts.

Economics: Listen to the podcast You Can’t Always Get What You Want. This podcast is a short economics tip based on the Rolling Stones song by the same title. Take up the podcaster’s challenge to find a short clip from one of your favorite pop songs that deals with economics and base a message around that idea that you can then podcast. For more economics podcast ideas, visit Gus A. Stavros Center for Free Enterprise and Economic Education and scroll down the page to “Stavros Center on iTunesU.” Their podcasts are for multiple grade levels and include an economic concept, teaching tips, and activity ideas.

Social Studies: Create a podcast on an historical topic. Visit The Education Podcast Network: History for examples. Find many more social studies podcasts for the classroom on The Education Podcast Network.

Source: http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/printouts/podcasts-nuts-bolts-creating-30311.html

See also This I Believe essays